Statement of Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct

The decisions and actions of NDT and CM personnel have a profound impact on the world we live in, and society at large. Making a clear and public commitment to operating with integrity and honesty is essential to create a greater level of trust and confidence, and a positive perception of the non-destructive testing profession. 

Code of Conduct
The Engineering Council and the Royal Academy of Engineering have jointly created a Statement of Ethical Principles for all engineering professionals. The British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing (BINDT) has adopted these principles and has also included values that are specific to BINDT.

Engineering professionals work to enhance the wellbeing of society. In doing so, they are required to maintain and promote high ethical standards and challenge unethical behaviour. There are four fundamental principles for ethical behaviour and decision-making. These are set out below, together with examples of how each should be applied.

Members of the British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, in recognition of the importance of the engineering profession in affecting the quality of life, should accept personal obligations to act with integrity in the public interest and maintain and improve their competence.

For PCN certificate holders, additional ethical principles are specified in the document CP27, which can be located at http://www.bindt.org/downloads/CP27.pdf. Members of BINDT who are also PCN certificate holders should therefore comply with this document and CP27 ‘Code of Ethics for PCN Certificate Holders’.

Honesty and Integrity:

Engineering professionals have a duty to uphold the highest standards of professional conduct, including openness, fairness, honesty and integrity. They should:
  • Act in a reliable and trustworthy manner
  • Be alert to the ways in which their work and behaviour might affect others and respect the privacy, rights and reputations of other parties and individuals
  • Respect confidentiality
  • Declare conflicts of interest
  • Avoid deception and take steps to prevent or report corrupt practices or professional misconduct
  • Reject bribery and improper influence
  • Notify the CEO of the British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing on receiving a civil or criminal conviction, becoming bankrupt or disqualified under the Company Directors’ Disqualification Act, 1986.

Respect for Life, Law, the Environment and Public Good:
Engineering professionals have a duty to obey all applicable laws and regulations and give due weight to facts, published standards
and guidance in the wider public interest. They should:
  • Hold paramount the health and safety of others and draw attention to hazards
  • Ensure their work is lawful and justified
  • Recognise the importance of physical and cyber security and data protection
  • Respect and protect personal information and intellectual property
  • Protect, and where possible improve, the quality of the built and natural environments
  • Maximise the public good and minimise both actual and potential adverse effects for their own and succeeding generations
  • Take due account of the limited availability of natural resources
  • Uphold the reputation and standing of the profession.

Accuracy and rigour:
Engineering professionals have a duty to acquire and use wisely the understanding, knowledge and skills needed to perform their role.
They should:
  • Always act with care
  • Perform services only in areas in which they are currently competent or under competent supervision
  • Keep their knowledge and skills up-to-date
  • Assist the development of engineering knowledge and skills in others
  • Undertake continuing professional development to maintain professional standards
  • Present and review theory, evidence and interpretation honestly, accurately, objectively and without bias, while respecting reasoned alternative views
  • Identify, evaluate, quantify, mitigate and manage risks
  • Not knowingly mislead or allow others to be misled
  • Report any violations of this code by another member to the CEO of the British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing.

Leadership and Communication:
Engineering professionals have a duty to abide by and promote high standards of leadership and communication. They should:
  • Be aware of the issues that engineering and technology raise for society and listen to the aspirations and concerns of others
  • Accept responsibility for work carried out under their supervision, treat subordinates fairly and without bias and advance their learning and competence
  • Encourage others to advance their learning and competence
  • Promote equality, diversity and inclusion
  • Promote public awareness and understanding of the impact and benefits of engineering achievements
  • Be objective and truthful in any statement made in their professional capacity
  • Raise concerns about danger, risk, malpractice or wrongdoing that affects others (‘blow the whistle’) and support a colleague or any other person to whom they have a duty of care who, in good faith, raises any such concern
  • Challenge statements or policies that cause them professional concern.

The decisions and actions of NDT and CM personnel have a profound impact on the world we live in and society at large. Making a clear and public commitment to operating with integrity and honesty is essential to create a greater level of trust and confidence and a positive perception of the non-destructive testing and condition monitoring professions.

All members, across all grades of membership, undertake to advance the objects of the Institute and to be governed by the Bye-Laws. The above is the Code of Conduct, which members are required to embrace. Any failure to do so can be dealt with by expulsion from Institute membership and consequent loss of Engineering Registration, if applicable.