Publications Awards

Institute Awards 

The Institute presents the following three publications awards:

The William Gardner Award
The William Gardner Award is for the best paper published in the Proceedings of the Institute’s Annual Conference on NDT by a student or person in the early stages (first five years) of their career.

Details of award: A certificate, a cash sum of £250 and free Institute member for one year.
Eligibility: Anyone who is either a student or within the first five years of full-time employment, who presents a paper at the NDT Annual Conference and has the paper published in the proceedings.
Nomination arrangements: Anyone who notifies the Conference organisers when submitting their paper that they meet the criteria.
Committee responsible: NDT Technical Committee.

The William Gardner Award was not awarded in 2020.

A list of all previous winners of the William Gardner Award can be found here.

The John Grimwade Medal
The John Grimwade Medal is for the best paper published in Insight in the preceding year.

Details of award: An engraved silver medal plus certificates to author and co-authors. (A restricted fund covers the cost of the medal.)
Eligibility: Any Institute member who has published in Insight will be automatically considered (co-authors need not be members but only the lead author receives a medal).
Nomination arrangements: Automatic. Shortlist prepared by the Technical Committee.
Committee responsible: NDT Technical Committee.


2019 winners: Dr David A Gunn, Simon J Holyoake, Dr Ben A J Dashwood, Dr Paul B Wilkinson, Dr Colin R Brett,
Humphrey C Wallis, Wayne Leman and Professor John G Rees


The recipients of the John Grimwade Medal for 2019 are Dr David A Gunn, Simon J Holyoake, Dr Ben A J Dashwood,
Dr Paul B Wilkinson, Dr Colin R Brett, Humphrey C Wallis
, Wayne Leman and Professor John G Rees for their paper, titled:
Ultrasonic testing of laboratory
samples representing monopile wind turbine foundations’, which was published in
Insight
, Vol 61,
No 4, April 2019 (DOI: 10.1784/insi.2019.61.4.187).


Dr David Gunn is a Principal Scientific Officer working for the British Geological Survey (BGS). He is an engineering geophysicist who has spent 28 years at the BGS developing novel geophysical seismic and electrical methods. David’s work includes geotechnical imaging via seismic proxy, applied for anatomical assessment of geotechnical assets.

Simon Holyoake is a Research Electronics Engineer at the BGS specialising in instrumentation development. He joined the BGS in 2007 with a BEng in electronics engineering and has specialised in the development of specialist instrumentation for geophysical and geotechnical property measurement and characterisation. In 2013, Simon undertook work using bespoke ultrasonic transducers to develop techniques to assess the quality of marine engineered structures, leading both the instrument development and laboratory testing programmes.

Dr Ben Dashwood is an engineering geophysicist who, prior to joining the BGS, worked in consultancy, undertaking a wide range of near-surface geophysical surveying predominantly in the transportation sector. His present research investigates how geotechnical parameters may be measured non-invasively via geophysical proxies, with a particular focus on the use of seismi
c techniques.

Dr Paul Wilkinson is a theoretical geophysicist who has worked for 16 years at the BGS researching and developing geophysical imaging and monitoring techniques. Recent innovations include time-lapse electrical resistivity for monitoring moisture-driven earthwork stability, surface movement detection using geoelectrical monitoring data and modelling the ultrasonic diagnosis of monopile foundation conditions.

Dr Colin Brett is currently the Director of Technology with the UK Research Centre in Non-Destructive Evaluation (RCNDE). Previously, he worked for 35 years in the power gen
eration industry, where he managed and delivered non-destructive testing solutions for nuclear, coal, oil, gas and renewable generation assets. The work recognised by this award was performed while he was Head of Inspection at Uniper Technologies Ltd, based near Nottingham in the UK.

Humphrey Wallis is a mechanical engineer who joined the BGS in 1991. He has managed the Research and Development Engineering facility for the last 21 years. Humphrey and the te
am serve the needs of the scientific community through the design and manufacture of equipment that cannot be acquired commercially.

Wayne Leman is a Senior Technician with the Research and Development Engineering facili
ty at the BGS, joining the team in 2000. He is a time-served engineer who trained in the defence industry. Over the last 20 years, Wayne has contributed to many innovative projects supporting geoscience.

Professor John Rees has been a representative on several government advisory boards for risk reduction. His appointments include former leadership of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Natural Hazards Theme and, as of 2020, is Director of the Multi-Hazard and Resilience Challenge at the BGS.

John has led research and innovation to characterise major earth hazards, evaluate natural resources and address environmental impacts and was responsible for overseeing the BGS’s important national seismic and geomagnetic observatories.

A list of all previous winners of the John Grimwade Medal can be found here.

The Ron Halmshaw Award
Established in 1994 through the generosity of Dr R Halmshaw MBE, The Ron Halmshaw Award is for the best paper on radiography published in Insight in the preceding year.

Details of award: Certificate and a cash sum of £350 from trustee fund set up by Dr Ron Halmshaw.
Eligibility: Anyone who has published a radiography paper in Insight will be considered.
Nomination arrangements: Automatic. Shortlist prepared by the Technical Committee.
Committee responsible: NDT Technical Committee.

2019 winners: Johann Kastner, Christian Gusenbauer, Bernhard Plank, Jonathan Glinz and Sascha Senck

The 2019 winners are Johann Kastner, Christian Gusenbauer, Bernhard Plank, Jonathan G
linz and Sascha Senck for their paper, titled: ‘Challenges for grating interferometer X-ray computed tomography for practical applications in industry’, which appeared in Insight, Vol 61, No 3, March 2019 (DOI: 10.1784/insi.2019.61.3.149).


Johann Kastner received his PhD degree from the University of Vienna, Austria, in 1995. He is Head of the Computed Tomography (CT) Research Group and Vice President for R&D at the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, Austria. Johann is author or co-author of more than 220 scientific publications and several book chapters and is Chair of the conference series on Industrial Computed Tomography 2006-2020. His research interests are X-ray computed tomography (XCT), radiography and materials science.


Christian Gusenbauer studied technical physics at the Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria, as well as medical physics at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria. His research interests are CT, quality inspection, non-destructive testing (NDT) of metals and image data processing. Christian is currently working as a Computed Tomography Engineer at Nemak Linz and is responsible for the operation of at-line and in-line XCT systems.

Bernhard Plank is a researcher in the field of materials and process engineering and has worked as a Research Associate with the Computed Tomography Research Group at the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria since 2008. As Research Project Manager, he coordinates the materials characterisation area of the CT group. In 2018, Bernhard started his PhD studies at the University of Augsburg (Technical Faculty Mathematical Natural Sciences – Chair Mechanical Engineering), Germany, in the field of material sciences and systematic analysis of three-dimensional pore structures in fibre-reinforced plastics using 3D X-ray methods.

Jonathan Glinz received his MSc degree in healthcare and rehabilitation technology from the University of Applied Sciences Technikum Wien, Vienna, Austria. In 2017, he started working as a Research Associate with the Computed Tomography Research Group at the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria. Starting his doctoral programme in December 2019, Jonathan’s research interests focus on three-dimensional characterisation of industrial lightweight materials using X-ray phase-contrast micro-CT.

Sascha Senck received his PhD degree from the University of Vienna in 2012. He is currently working as Research Project Manager with the Computed Tomography Research Group at the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria (Wels Campus), Austria, and manages several research projects in the field of NDT and biomedical engineering. Sascha’s research focuses on the three-dimensional characterisation of advanced materials and biological tissue using X-ray and phase-contrast micro-CT.

A list of all previous winners of the Ron Halmshaw Award can be found here.

Details of all Institute Awards can be found here.